Intergenerational Quiching

Bacon-Cheese Quiche

Mother and daughter quichers

Mother and daughter quichers

Hey!  That doesn’t look much like bacon and cheese quiche!  You’re right.  That’s me and my mom.  We are two parts of a three-generation family tradition of quiche.  It all started years ago when my mom called her mom to find out her recipe for Quiche Lorraine.  My mom jotted down that recipe on a notecard and used it to cook countless quiches for her family over the years.  I think all families have that default recipe that they had all the time.  Maybe yours was meatloaf or lasagna or fried chicken.  Ours was quiche.

Side 1.  Can you tell it's been used a few times?

Side 1. Can you tell it’s been used a few times?

Side 2

Side 2

So she wrote down her mom’s recipe.  I have a version of this recipe card too!  It doesn’t have all of that fun patina, though.

I will also share my mom’s crust recipe beyond the jump.  You’ll know why when you look at this picture.

Because her crust is always perfect, that's why!!!

Because her crust is always perfect, that’s why!!!

When I look at that crust and those perfect little scallop shapes, I can see my mom shaping it with her knuckle.  When I see that, I can also see my grandma’s hands.  When I see my own hands, I see me making the pinches far too shallow and pointy.  But I’ll get better.  I learned from the best.

As should be obvious by now, I had my mom take on the Bacon-Cheese quiche because she is the quiche master.  Who better to tell us all whether this is a good recipe than someone who has made more quiches than she can count?  (I got an audio recording of the two of us talking about this quiche, but WordPress charges you extra money to have enough space on your blog to upload an audio file.  Boo!  The internets tell me that I can make a movie of the audio file, upload it to YouTube, then post that here.  I want to have time for that, and I’ve also got two fellow bloggers cooking and writing their way through a January/February issue and nipping at my heels.  I need to let them move on.  I promise to make the video and add it back here to the blog as soon as possible.  It’s a really fun interview!)

Mostly, the quiche master did not love this recipe.  She liked the onion flavor, although my dad, the other tester, did not.  She thought it would be lighter and fluffier than it actually turned out.  She thought blind-baking the crust was a great technique, though.  Her usual crust is just cooked right along with the filling.  Mom, Dad, and I all agreed that this method keeps the crust from getting soggy.  She said she’d do it again.  That’s huge, don’t you think?  Someone who has been making quiche for over 30 years and who learned from someone else who also made quiche for decades is going to change her technique based on Everyday Food!  She did not have the same pan problem as Beth and I.  She used a nine-inch pie plate (not her usual pan, she usually goes with a tart pan) and found she had exactly the right amount of filling.

My ultimate recommendation?  Make the quiche from the recipe from my grandma via my mom, use her crust, and blind-bake the crust.  Oh, and I like the onions, so add those too.

Stay tuned for that video.  I’ll also add in pictures of the original quicher, my grandma.

Crust recipe:

Side 1

Side 1

Side 2 (my mom would appreciate it if you ignored her math)

Side 2 (my mom would appreciate it if you ignored her math)

 

 

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