Aloha!

Hawaiian Hot Dog

Must. Not. Eat. Hand.

Must. Not. Eat. Hand.

So here’s a hot dog that’s so perfect for me that I’m genuinely surprised I’m not the one who came up with it.  I love pineapple.  I love red onion.  I love hot dogs.  Really, this one is hitting all of the high notes.  It’s also similar to a hot dog I had at my favorite hot dog place in Chicago, Chubby Weiners.  That restaurant holds the ignominious distinction of being where D and I had dinner on every presidential election day since we moved to the neighborhood.  Yeah, that’s only two elections.  And I think we maybe decided to go there on a non-election day once.  But still.  To me, this is the Election Day headquarters for our family.  Some of you who are familiar with the Chicago hot dog scene (and didn’t chuckle at that last phrase) will wonder why I didn’t pick Hot Doug’s.  Well, because my favorite hot dog place can’t be somewhere where I have to wait in line for an hour.  It just can’t.  And Hot Doug’s is closing, so I have to pick something else.  Why not Weiner’s Circle?  Because I’ve never been, and I don’t like confrontation.  I do, however, love this Conan O’Brien sketch  where Triumph the Insult Comic Dog and Jack MacBrayer go to Wiener’s Circle.  Well, now I have to try not to fall down a You Tube rabbit hole of Triumph videos.  Did you guys know he visited The Real Housewives of Atlanta?  It’s really hard not to click that.

Why am I spending all this time talking about local hot dogs instead of writing about the recipe?  Because it’s such a no-brainer.  It’s just delicious.  It’s also the kind of thing that you already know whether you’ll like it without me telling you anything.  Do you  like pineapple?  Welcome aboard.  That was quick.

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How’s your burger?

Pesto chicken burger

Sigh.  Too bad the tomato falling off of it looks like a tongue.  :(

Sigh. Too bad the tomato falling off of it looks like a tongue. 😦

This is yet another recipe where several liberties were taken, but it all ended up for the best.  First of all, ground chicken?  No.  Ground turkey was at Aldi so that is that.  Second, foccacia bread?  Anything I found was kinda skimpy and flat and didn’t seem like it would make much of a burger bun.  So I bought pretzel buns.  No regrets.  From there, I just followed the recipe.

I love that this recipe mixes in some spinach with the basil in the pesto and uses walnuts instead of pine nuts.  Anything to make things cheaper, but still taste good, is a good idea by me.

And this is just a tasty burger option.  The fresh mozzarella and the grilled tomato were all so squishy and wonderful.  The pesto gave it just enough bite.  The burger itself was earthy and pleasant.  D and I ate it out on our back porch and had a wonderful summer evening.

…Yes, that title is a Dumb and Dumber reference.  Once again, G dates herself almost to the second.

More side dish and less main

Mexican Charred Corn Dog

Who invited that hot dog?!

Who invited that hot dog?!

This post is really just a recommendation to make the topping and skip the hot dog.  The topping is completely delicious.  I didn’t think that cooking corn (I used defrosted frozen stuff) in a dry skillet would actually make much of a difference for flavor.  I was so wrong.  The browning brings out the sugar in the corn, making it the perfect foil for all of the other sour ingredients.  I think I overcooked my corn a little, though.  The recipe says to roast the corn in a dry skillet until it is browned, then add oil and scallion greens, and cook until the scallions are soft.  Well, the corn doesn’t magically stop cooking once you add the oil and scallions, so I cut this whole process off before the scallions were cooked because the corn was edging from brown to black.  That having been said, it was delicious.  I think I would brown the corn by itself until it is very nearly fully browned, then add the oil and scallions to brown it the rest of the way while the onions cook.

I wound up absolutely loving the corn topping, dressing, everything.  So I was super excited to eat the hot dog.  Here’s roughly a transcript of what went on in my head with each bite: “whoo hoo!  Corn!  Lime mayo!  This is awesome! (chew, chew) Oh, yeah, hot dog.  Huh.  Bun.  Yeah…ok, I guess.”  Then I’d take another bite and repeat that.  The hot dog and bun really got in the way of the salad.  Unlike the banh mi dog where the hot dog added some salt and umami to the other flavors, here it just seemed like an afterthought.  So just serve the salad as a side with a hot dog that you dress as you please.  Curious how I prefer my hot dog?  I thought you’d never ask.  I like it with cheap yellow mustard, corn relish, and raw onions.  Actually, I once had that hot dog with homemade pickled watermelon rind added on and it was perfect.  That would be my ultimate dog…with this corn salad on the side.

On the other hand, you could just grill corn on the cob on the grill and dress it with the lime mayo, Cojita cheese, and chili powder.  That would probably be the best of the best.  That cheese, by the way, tastes almost exactly like feta.  I’ve also had corn dressed this way with freshly grated Parmesan.  That works too.

 

Hot dogs: the other red meat

Banh mi hot dogs

As B said, "Is there a hot dog in there somewhere?"

As B said, “Is there a hot dog in there somewhere?”

Before I tell you about this awesome hot dog, I need to tell you a disgusting but true story.  You know how Chinese restaurants usually sell items where you can swap out one protein for another?  So shrimp fried rice, chicken fried rice, pork fried rice, etc. etc.  Yes, I’m referring to American Chinese restaurants.  I don’t know what real Chinese restaurants serve.  Probably not egg rolls, so that’s a deal breaker right there.  Anyway, cultural insensitivity aside…you’re familiar with the choices of protein at your standard Chinese restaurant.  It’s usually beef, pork, shrimp, chicken, maybe tofu.  I once saw a flyer for a Chinese restaurant where one of the protein choices was…hot dog.  That’s right, hot dog.  You could order hot dog fried rice.  This struck me as absolutely hilarious because hot dog fried rice is the kind of poverty chow that everyone makes in a pinch (especially in college or right before grocery shopping), but no one would ever advertise in a thousand years.  It’s like a restaurant bragging that they offer American cheese microwaved on a bagel or Pop Tarts.  Also, I can hear your eyes rolling incredulously through the tubes, so I’ll just leave this here.  You’re welcome.

So you’d forgive me for being skeptical about a banh mi hot dog.  But this thing is delicious.  The carrot slaw is lovely.  The mayo and cucumber cools down the jalapeno slices.  The cilantro leaves bring their special bitter bite.  The hot dog brings the salt…  This is just a delicious and easy meal.  I’ve actually made it a few times before.  I wouldn’t feel embarrassed serving it to guests.  Unlike hot dog fried rice.  That’s just…  No.

 

Stir fry for days

Shrimp and Scallion Stir Fry

over those pesky rice noodles

over those pesky rice noodles

Stir-fried noodles with eggplant and basil

eggplant and basil in the dead of winter.  decadent!

eggplant and basil in the dead of winter. decadent!

Stir-fried turkey in lettuce wraps

It has kind of a birth of Venus thing going on, doesn't it?

It has kind of a birth of Venus thing going on, doesn’t it?

So many stir fries in this issue.  If you add up the stir fry feature with the winter green sautees, that’s a whole lot of warm veggie glop on top of rice, pasta, or something.  These three are quite representative of all of the stir frying going on in issue #69 in that they are all ok, but not great, and all low calorie (until you start adding noodles and such…).

The Shrimp and Scallion Stir Fry can literally be summed up just by reading the name of the recipe.  See, there’s some shrimp and some scallions and you stir fry them.  Still with me?  Oh, and there’s garlic.  I served it over rice noodles because I’m still trying to get rid of those suckers.

The Stir-fried noodles with eggplant and basil was very good, if somewhat impractical.  I like to try and cook seasonally and Everyday Food usually supports that.  They’ve got a whole “in season” section and everything.  But then they have a chicken sandwich with zucchini on it and a stir fry with eggplant and basil in this issue.  Oh, and the chicken salad with basil too.  On one hand, I can’t complain.  It is definitely awesome to taste basil in the dead of winter.  It almost makes me believe that summer is coming, which it obviously isn’t.  It’s currently 28 degrees outside and it’s March 23rd.  There just won’t be an end to winter.  So buy some basil!

The Stir-fried turkey in lettuce wraps was good, but I still don’t care for lettuce wraps as a concept for the same reason that I don’t like hard shell tacos, too messy.  I know.  I know.  Polly Prissy Pants over here.  Also, when you make lettuce wraps, you have to spend so much time delicately removing each lettuce leaf carefully, carefully, so carefully….dang it!  It tore!  Then what do you do?  Make a very tiny lettuce wrap?  Give up and start over?  These are serious questions folks.  So the flavor of this recipe is quite good, but it’s not good enough to make me like lettuce wraps.  Oh, and yeah, that’s iceberg lettuce.  I know I’d get better results with a fancier lettuce, but I’d be angrier when the leaves tear because of the extra money.  So…kind of a catch 22.

In conclusion, if you need a stir fry, go to your EF collection and grab #69.  Whew!

Superb owl (hat tip to Stephen Colbert, MFA)

This meal was a loosely structured attempt to make a vegetarian version of a traditional Super Bowl feast.  The centerpiece was supposed to be the beet chips from this issue of Everyday Food.  As it turned out, those were the weakest part of the meal.  I’ll get the usual formalities out of the way, so we can move on to talking about much tastier things.  If you stick with me, there’s an awesome recipe for slow-cooker BBQ tofu at the end of this post.  We just have to talk about these loser chips from the magazine real quick…

Beet chips

"Barbeque chips"

“Barbeque chips”

This turned out to be a ton of work for very little return.  I need to find another recipe.  I have faith that beet chips can be made at home.  I used to love the beet chips at a bar in Urbana, IL, Crane Alley.  They served them with a goat cheese dip that was just unreal.  I’ll be honest, though.  I think those were fried.  That might really be the secret here.  Don’t send the oven to do a deep fryer’s job.  I busted on the mandoline for this one.  I followed the instructions where you stack cookie sheets on top of each other in the oven!  I tried to follow the instructions about taking them out when they “changed color” and believed them when they said they would be crispier as they cooled.  They didn’t.  These were, for the most part, soggy little discs of beet that took forever and created a ton of dishes.  Sad trombone…  But I’m keeping the faith because those handful of chips that actually were crisp were really tasty.  I sprinkled them with smoked sea salt to approximate the taste of barbeque chips.

Buffalo-wing style cauliflower

"wings"

“wings”

Ok, let’s move on to the real stars!  I made a recipe that I’ve been dying to make since I first got on Pinterest.  The buffalo cauliflower.  Yes, Pinterest fans!  That one!  What a cool recipe.  You basically batter some cauliflower florets with a buttermilk batter, bake them in the oven (while wishing they were deep fried…), then toss them with buffalo sauce and serve them with blue cheese dressing.  Is it good?  My word, yes.  Does it taste like buffalo wings?  Don’t be silly.  Of course not.  It tastes roughly like roasted cauliflower with a tangy buttermilk pancake wrapped around it, all doused in buffalo sauce.  If that sounds good to you, you’ll like this.  If not, just make wings and move on with your life.

Slow cooker BBQ Tofu

"barbeque sandwiches"

“barbeque sandwiches”

Here’s the real winner, and I feel very awkward saying this because I’m not really one for self-promotion.  This is my recipe for slow-cooker BBQ tofu.  It is a modification, adjustment, and reimagining of two recipes.  One is a BBQ tofu recipe from Not Your Mother’s Slow Cooker Family Favorites.  I made that recipe straight-up one time and found it lacking.  I thought the tofu itself was really good.  The slow-cooking gave it a kind of roasty edge.  The sauce tasted too ketchuppy, and it tasted like it wasn’t done yet.  At the same time, the tofu definitely couldn’t have been cooked any longer without ruining it.  The other recipe is the smokey onion tofu marinade from Bean by Bean by the impossibly-named and impossibly wonderful Crescent Dragonwagon.  By marinating the tofu pieces overnight in her marinade, slow-cooking the sauce for some extra time on its own before adding the tofu chunks, then finishing them all together, this winds up being, quite honestly, my favorite BBQ sandwich.  I crave this stuff.

I feel I have to say a little more about my changes to the sauce recipe.  As I said before, when I made it the first time, it was ketchuppy.  What it was really missing was smoke.  Well, that’s a difficult one for a tofu slow-cooker recipe, right?  I added in smoke wherever I thought I could find it.  The Dragonwagon marinade uses liquid smoke.  I added liquid smoke to the BBQ sauce.  I also added a couple chopped chipotles in adobo, aka smoked jalapenos.  Those adjustments finally brought the smokey flavor.

It is with much trepidation that I release my baby out into the wild, but here it is.  The recipe that I’ve given the most work and the one of which I am the most proud.  Serve it at a Super Bowl party and make the veggies/non-veggies fall in love with you.  Or keep it all to yourself.

Slow-cooker barbeque tofu (adapted and adjusted from Not your Mother’s Slow Cooker Family Favorites by Beth Hensperger (Harvard Common Press: 2009))

The first step is to marinate the tofu pieces.

Smokey onion marinade (adapted from Bean by Bean: A Cookbook by Crescent Dragonwagon (Workman Publishing: 2012))

  • 1/4 c soy sauce
  • 1 T vegetable oil
  • 1 large white onion, peeled and quartered
  • cloves from one head of garlic
  • 2 T cider vinegar
  • 2 drops liquid smoke
  • 3 16-oz blocks of extra firm tofu (no need to drain), cut into 1-inch cubes
  1. Combine all ingredients except for the tofu in a food processor fitted with the blade attachment.  Pulse to break it up then process until it’s ground as fine as you can get it.  This is a sloppy, liquid marinade with little bits of onion in it.  It’s going to leak out of the food processor on to the counter.  Just a heads up.  If you have a very intense blender (I don’t) like maybe a vitamix, you could maybe do this in the blender and prevent that mess, but a normal blender will not break up an onion.  You don’t lose enough marinade to make this a big deal.
  2. Place the tofu in a nonreactive dish or large ziploc bag and pour the marinade over it.  Cover and refrigerate, trying to remember to turn the chunks every once in a while, overnight.  Crescent says you can let this marinate for up to 6 days(!)

Now that you have the tofu marinated, I’ll give you the rest of the recipe

  • 2 c ketchup
  • 1/4 firmly packed brown sugar
  • 3 T soy sauce
  • 3 chipotle peppers in adobe, chopped fine
  • 2 T cider or red wine vinegar
  • 1 T spiciest brown mustard you can find
  • 1 t smoked paprika
  • 1/2 t garlic powder
  • 1/4 t citrus herb seasoning salt from the December 2011 Everyday Food, see this post (actually recipe calls for lemon pepper seasoning, which I’m sure is fine)
  • 1/4 t Angostura bitters
  • 1 t liquid smoke
  1. While the tofu is still marinating, get a jump start on the sauce.  In a medium bowl, combine ketchup, brown sugar, soy sauce, chipotles, vinegar, mustard, paprika, garlic powder, citrus seasoning salt, bitters, and liquid smoke.  Stir to combine.
  2. Coat the inside of the crock with nonstick cooking spray.  Pour sauce into crock.  Cover and cook on low for 1 1/2 hours.  Stir the sauce well.
  3. Brush excess marinade off of the tofu and add it to the crock.  Just the excess.  Some bits will cling to the tofu pieces and that’s absolutely fine.  Cover and cook on low for another 4-6 hours, until very hot and fragrant.
  4. Serve on rolls.  I like this with raw onions and pickles.  I think it needs a little sharpness and snap.

Well, now I’m starving.

 

Poached chicken madness

Poached chicken breasts

a poach, poach, poach

a poach, poach, poach

This issue recommends poaching boneless, skinless chicken breasts.  They are preaching to the choir.  I’ve already said before that poaching chicken breasts is the only way to go.  It is so easy, so quick, and so fool-proof.  My sister-in-law told me at Christmas that she throws chicken breasts into a crockpot on low and lets them go for a while to poach.  This sounds genius and I will follow up on all of the details for you, dear readers.  The poached chicken recipe in the magazine is especially fun because it has to flavoring the poaching liquid.  That’s not something I normally bother with, but I think I’m convinced to change my ways. The recipe uses an onion, carrot, celery, garlic, lemon, some peppercorns, and some sprigs of thyme and parsley, but it says right at the top that you should just use whatever aromatics you have on hand.  I love a recipe that tells me to just do whatever.  I also love getting random celery out of the house some other way besides throwing it away.  Same thing with the end of a bunch of parsley.  Long story short, I made this recipe at least three times this past month.  I’ve lost count.  And I made it three different ways.  It’s going on the notecard!  Bookmark the recipe and never deal with weird sauteed chicken breasts ever again!

And what did I do with my chicken?

I made two of the four sandwiches.  We didn’t make the zucchini and pesto sandwich.  B and I have talked about this.  Telling people to make something with zucchini in the dead of winter is pretty ridiculous.

Hummus & Carrots

hummus, shredded carrots, sliced poached chicken breast, and baby spinach on wheat

hummus, shredded carrots, sliced poached chicken breast, and baby spinach on wheat

Yum!  Healthy!  Filling!  (Needs mayo)

Avocado & Parm

mashed avocado with lemon juice, shaved parmesan cheese, sliced poached chicken breast, on wheat

mashed avocado with lemon juice, shaved parmesan cheese, sliced poached chicken breast, on wheat

Yum!  Rich avocado with salty parmesan cheese!  (Needs mayo)  B tells me this would have been better on white bread.  She’s right.

B made the classic.  Your thoughts, B?

The Classic… plus pickled onions, because pickled onions are yummy.

The Classic… plus pickled onions, because pickled onions are yummy.

B says, its a chicken sandwich.  It had mayo so thats a plus.  But it wasn’t anything that special.  The pickled onions helped it a bit, but that was all on me.  Back to you , G.

G again.  I also made the chicken salad with scallions and yogurt.

shredded chicken, yogurt, scallions, and chopped basil served on spinach

shredded chicken, yogurt, scallions, and chopped basil served on spinach

This is me channeling my inner 1950’s housewife and serving the chicken salad in a proper little mound.  This is a very tasty chicken salad.  The basil adds a lot, which makes up for the fact that getting basil in January is roughly as difficult and unreasonable as getting zucchini.

Ok, one more thing and then we’ll let you go.  Here’s a picture of the egg salad from the magazine.

Not so very lightened-up if you wind up eating the egg yolks on their own later in the week.

Not so very lightened-up if you wind up eating the egg yolks on their own later in the week.

The recipe is hidden in the back under the big title “Everyday Food on TV.”  Do you guys remember that show?  D and I loved it.  We watched it on PBS in our old, old apartment, then DVR’ed in our old apartment.  This one is John Barricelli’s recipe.  I always liked him.  Maybe because he was the only guy, and I thought that must mean he was cool if he was willing to be on a show with a bunch of ladies AND be the baking guy.  Normally, you’d think the only guy on the show would be there to talk about grilling or meat or something else bro, but no, John normally made tarts.  You have to love that.  Also, he had a super pronounced (somewhere out East…) accent that he made no attempt to hide.  I got the feeling that John was a man who was very comfortable just being himself.

And his egg salad?  Um, it’s fine.  It uses avocado instead of egg yolks and very little of the creamy stuff, so it’s very, very good for a post holiday meal.  Here is my best attempt to write it up as a proper recipe.  The magazine has it like a quote from John.

Lightened up egg-salad sandwich (adapted from Everyday Food Issue #69 January/February 2010)

  • 4 hard-cooked egg whites, chopped
  • 1/2 avocado, pitted and diced medium
  • 1/4 small red onion, diced small
  • 1 t mayo
  • 1 t sour cream
  • 1 t Dijon mustard
  • salt and pepper

Combine all of the ingredients, season with salt and pepper.  Serve on whole wheat bread with arugula.

You might be asking how many people this is supposed to serve.  I really don’t know.  I usually only have two eggs at breakfast, so I took this as being a two person recipe.  If you have a bigger appetite, this probably serves one.

 

Surprising baby food

Spinach frittata with green salad

Yes, we are definitely in the "healthy issue."

Yes, we are definitely in the “healthy issue.”

Braised collards with tomatoes

It's a good thing, y'all!

It’s a good thing, y’all!

Black-bean and brown-rice cakes

Surely if I add enough bread and sauce, this will taste like something....

Surely if I add enough bread and sauce, this will taste like something….

No one needs to tell me how lucky I am that my son is a great eater.  It is a huge relief and a blessing.  He doesn’t always eat a ton of what’s put in front of him, and it sometimes takes him three tries to really get to like something, but he is a pretty adventurous eater for a toddler.  I’ve been told many times by doctors and other professional types that this will ratchet back and he will go through a picky stage where he’ll only want mac and cheese.  But I’m enjoying this adventurous baby while I’ve got him.  Which brings me to the point of this post, these were three recipes that I served my little guy and didn’t think he’d really like them.  Spinach, collard greens, and black bean burgers with cilantro sauce don’t typically show up on the kids’ menu.  D and I liked one of these recipes very much, one pretty much, and one we were super pumped that the baby could eat it for us.  🙂

The braised collards were out-G.D.-standing.  They take a legitimate three hours plus, but that’s mostly just time on the stove.  I was lucky enough to buy pre-washed and pre-chopped collard greens, so this was just a matter of cutting up an onion and smashing some garlic cloves for me.  And the taste is wonderful.  I’m not really one for soul food.  I’m just not.  I lived in Georgia for a year when I was a kid, but I never developed a taste for it.  I don’t cook southern style stuff (which D actually really likes…sorry sweetie) and my affinity for Everyday Food plays right into that.  With the exception of the occasional BBQ summertime menu, Everyday Food keeps well above the Mason-Dixon line.  D was actually very surprised to see this one.  I believe the exact quote was “This is Everyday Food?  Ham hock, black eyed peas, and collards?!”  Well, to quote the great Scarlett O’Hara, “Fiddle dee dee!”  This is a delicious meal.  The slow cooking melds the flavors together beautifully to make a mild dish.  This is wonderful comfort food.  I will definitely make this one again.

Now the one we pretty much all three agreed on: the frittata and green salad.  The green salad was what it said it was.  Let’s leave it at that.  The frittata was nice.  It uses more egg whites than egg yolks, which leaves you in the difficult position of either doing something with all of those extra egg yolks or just throwing them out.  B suggested I make mayonnaise or orange curd.  These were fine ideas.  ….  I threw the yolks out a week later.  If you can think of something to do with the yolks or if you don’t mind pitching them, this is a fine recipe.  Or you could be a little less health-conscious and just leave them in.  I won’t tell.

All three members of my little clan loved the frittata on the first day.  J ate it up with minimal ketchup.  D and I both enjoyed it.  We had an extra one for dinner for J the next day, and I was dismayed to hear that he didn’t like it until D told me that the texture got really rubbery when he reheated it.  Maybe that’s because it’s mostly egg whites?  I don’t usually have a problem reheating egg dishes like quiche.  I’ll blame the egg whites.  Yet another reason to sneak those suckers back in there…

Last and least (depending on who you ask), the recipe that J loved and the adults haaaaated: the black bean and brown rice burgers.  Wow.  It’s not that they’re bad.  They’re not.  They’re just so bland.  Yes, even with all that jalapeno and cumin and the yogurt-cilantro sauce.  They tasted like refried beans.  We put them on rolls, added a bunch of the sauce, more cilantro, some red onion.  It tasted like…refried beans on a roll with a bunch of sauce, cilantro, and red onion.  J could not disagree more with this.  He ate all of our leftovers.  I want to say he ate these something like three or four days in a row.  He even ate one of the ones with jalapenos in it (we made separate burgers for the grownups) when my mom mistakenly fed him one.  He liked that one, too.  More power to you, J.

A Clinton Portis reference? Really?!

Chicken and lentil burger

Citrus herb seasoning salt

And here's what my meal would look like in a earthquake.  (really need to learn to take better pictures)

And here’s what my meal would look like in a earthquake. (really need to learn to take better pictures)

It makes more than this.

It makes more than this.

These are good burgers.  I will say that they aren’t the burgers you think they are.  You’d probably think that they are chicken burgers with some lentils.  It’s the other way around.  The chicken is really just binding together the lentils.  I found that odd, but tasty.  It has a good flavor.

One tip I will offer is to grind your own chicken.  But, G!  I don’t have anything to grind meat!  Don’t you need a Kitchen Aid attachment or something glamorous like that?  False.  All you need is a freezer and a food processor.  Check out these instructions.  I may never buy ground chicken or pork again.  I’ll probably still have to buy ground turkey because when do you find whole pieces of turkey except at Thanksgiving?  Although….I do have a plan for that…  My work gives out food gifts for the holidays.  It used to be a grocery store gift card, but someone with just enough knowledge of tax law to hate fun realized that that would be a taxable accession to income.  (boo!)  So now we get a fruit basket or a turkey. I take the fruit basket because I don’t know what to do with a whole turkey in the middle of December.  Or do I?  Next year, I’m taking the turkey, cutting it up, grinding the meat, and using the still slightly meaty bones to make stock.  As Clinton Portis once said, “Off the grid is off the chain.”

Back to my burgers.  We loved them.  J loved them once I introduced him to ketchup.  Oops.

I put the citrus herb seasoning on some frozen veggies with butter.  This is kind of cheating because I made the seasoning last year.  But this should go to show that it’s still good a year later.  Maybe not quite so fresh and citrusy as it was a year ago, but still good.  I highly recommend this seasoning on popcorn.  It also makes for a nice gift.  The little bit that I have is actually overflow from a present I sent my sister-in-law last year.  She liked the salt on popcorn too.  I’m not sure if I’ve done anything with it besides season frozen vegetables and sprinkle on popcorn. Maybe it’s time to make more.

Merry Christmas, by the way!  Please enjoy the flurry of posts as we all pull ourselves out of our food comas.

Yogurt-cheese spread (with special appearance by the rest of the sandwich)

Steak sandwich wrap

ignore my scaly gator-hands...

ignore my scaly gator-hands…

This was the recipe that used the leftovers from the notorious steak of the bazillion peppercorns.  So the key to these sandwiches was definitely to pick off the peppercorns.  Once that’s done, everything else is pretty straightforward.  I made these on some of those little “sandwich thin” things, because I sent D to the store with a grocery list that said “flatbread.”  These are, indeed, flat pieces of bread.  D acknowledges that it was a mistake.  But the sandwich thins are good!  And sometimes wraps are a mess.

This is mostly just a straight-ahead steak sandwich with the exception of that yogurt spread.  It’s low-fat Greek yogurt and Parmesan cheese in equal parts.  This spread should be on all sandwiches.  It’s so good.  It’s got the creaminess and tang of mayo (close enough) with the saltiness of cheese.  I’d eat this spread on crackers.  I’d dip carrots in it.  Suffice it to say, I’d recommend it.