If you don’t like these muffins, there must be something wrong with you…

Healthy Morning Muffins, Jan/Feb 2010, pg. 120-121

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This has been one of my ‘go-to’ recipes since 2010.  The healthy morning muffins are a great item to bring when you are spending the weekend with friends and/or family.  They travel well and they really are a healthy morning or afternoon snack.  My nieces (5 and 3 years old) love the muffins and I haven’t met an adult yet that hasn’t liked them.

Over the past four years I’ve experimented a bit with the muffin recipe (purposefully and by accident).  Once, I bought 1-minute oats. (I must have been in a rush at the grocery store.)  The muffins came out fine, a little drier than normal and less texture.  So, I would highly recommend rolled oats (what the recipe calls for), but if you make a mistake at the grocery store, it’s not a big deal.  I’ve also experimented with shredded zucchini.  Which is very good.  I substitute some of the carrots for the zucchini, but not all.  My carrot measurements are always different.  I always use 4 carrots; whether they are medium or large, it doesn’t matter to me.  The more carrot the better.  You just may need to cook the muffins longer if you put larger carrots in the batter.

The muffins are like carrot cake without the frosting.  They are very moist, and the flavors from the carrots, banana, and raisins complement the other perfectly.  The muffins are very sweet naturally and therefore a large amount of sugar isn’t required.

During the summer, my bananas go bad much faster than I can eat them.  I’ve made several double-batches of the muffins.  Leaving some for now and the rest I will wrap in aluminum foil, put that in a freezer Ziploc bag, and then into the freezer.  That works out perfect if I don’t have time to bake something when we go visiting, or if it’s too hot to bake.

Great recipe!  Highly recommend it!  The pages of my issue 69 are beginning to stick together, good thing my favorite recipes can all be found online too.

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Thanksgiving Stuffing!

Simple Stuffing with Apples, Raisins, and Walnuts

November 2007, pg. 100

I almost forgot to take a picture...Oops

I almost forgot to take a picture…Oops

Simple Stuffing Recipe

After vegetables have softened in step 2, stir in 2 apples (such as Gala or Granny Smith), cut into 1-inch pieces, ½ cup of raisins, and ½ cup of coarsely chopped walnuts. Cook until apples start to soften, 3 to 5 minutes. Add wine and continue.

*adapted from Everyday Food, Issue #47, pg. 101

This year, P and I went to his parents’ for Thanksgiving and his mom asked if we would bring the stuffing. I told her that would be perfect since I needed to make the apple and raisin version of the simple stuffing recipe for the blog. Before making the stuffing I showed P the recipe and he requested that I also add walnuts, so I did. We also brought homemade double-vanilla ice cream, blueberry scones, and homemade bread.

The night before Thanksgiving I just wanted to relax after a full day of baking the other items we would be contributing to the holiday weekend. I convinced myself to get up early the next morning and make the stuffing. I woke up at 7 am Thanksgiving Day giving myself 2 hours to shower, make the stuffing, eat breakfast, and pack the car. It took us 3 hours to get all of our chores done. Maybe next time I will take the advice given at the beginning of the recipe and make the stuffing the night before, so we can leave on time. But there were no worries of showing up late for dinner just missing out on playtime with our nieces.

The stuffing was very easy to make, it just took some time with all of the chopping. I must admit that I did roast the bread a few days before, eliminating that step the morning of. I chose to put two Gala apples in the stuffing and a cheap Chardonnay for the called Chard. It was definitely a cooking wine and not drinking wine. We had a glass later that night and decided the rest of the bottle would be used to cook with and not drink. I also used our own chicken stock instead of canned chicken broth. I honestly didn’t measure the amount required to saturate the bread but seemed to be less than the 29 ounces the recipe called for. I put the stuffing in a 9 x 13 inch Pyrex dish that was buttered and I covered it with buttered aluminum foil. NOTHING went inside our turkey.

The simple stuffing with apples, raisins, and walnuts was a hit! We had way too much food at our Thanksgiving table but everyone tried the stuffing and some even went back for seconds. The following day we had leftovers for lunch and the stuffing disappeared. Another success!